The Facts About Marijuana Concentrates

What are marijuana concentrates?  

Also known as: 710 (the word “OIL” flipped and spelled backwards), wax, ear wax, honey oil, budder, butane is hash oil, butane honey oil (BHO), shatter, dabs (dabbing), black glass, and errl.      Cannabis hash

What is it?

A marijuana concentrate is a highly potent THC- (Tetrahydrocannabinol) concentrated mass that looks like honey or butter. For that reason, it's often called “honey oil” or “budder” on the street.

How potent is this form of marijuana?

Marijuana concentrates contain extraordinarily high THC levels ranging from 40 to 80 percent THC amounts. This form of marijuana can be up to four times stronger in THC content than high grade or top shelf marijuana, which normally measures around 20 percent THC levels.   

How is it abused?

One form of abuse occurs orally by infusing marijuana concentrates in various food or drink products. Smoking remains the most popular form of ingestion by use of water or oil pipes.

Many abusers of marijuana concentrates also prefer using an e-cigarette/vaporizer because it is smokeless, odorless and easy to hide. The user takes a “dab” of the concentrate, then heats the substance using the e-cigarette/vaporizer, producing vapors that ensure an instant high. 

Using an e-cigarette/vaporizer to ingest marijuana concentrates is commonly referred to as “dabbing” or “vaping.”  

What are the effects of using marijuana concentrates?

Being a highly concentrated form of marijuana, the effects upon the user may be more psychologically and physically intense than plant marijuana use. 

To date, long term effects of marijuana concentrate use are not yet fully known; but, we do know the effects of plant marijuana use. These effects include paranoia, anxiety, panic attacks, and hallucinations

Additionally, the use of plant marijuana increases one’s heart rate and blood pressure. Plant marijuana users may also experience withdrawal and addiction problems.

Marijuana Facts: 

In 2014, 21.2% of high school seniors used marijuana in the past 30 days compared with 13.6% who smoked cigarettes. Source: NIDA, 2014 Monitoring the Future Survey

Measured for the first time in the MTF survey this year, the use of electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) is high among teens, reporting use in the past month:

  • 8.7 percent of 8th graders
  • 16.2 percent of 10th graders
  • 17.1 percent of 12th graders

Only 14.2 percent of 12th graders view regular e-cigarette use as harmful. 'The nicotine in e-cigarettes is vaporized and inhaled (not smoked), however, the health impact of e-cigarette use is not yet clear, nor is it known if use of e-cigarettes increases the likelihood of transitioning to conventional cigarettes or other tobacco products. Source: NIDA, 2014 Monitoring the Future Survey